Premier League to launch Coach Index program to help clubs increase staff diversity

Premier League to launch groundbreaking Coaching Index program next month in a bid to pressure clubs to increase staff diversity – with database providing access to BAME coach details

  • Premier League to launch Coaching Index to increase diversity in clubs
  • Revolutionary database will allow clubs to access names and contact details of BAME coaches with at least a UEFA B license
  • Coaches will also receive job alerts and opportunities such as networking events.











The Premier League will launch a “powerful” repertoire of elite, non-white, female coaches, increasing pressure on clubs to meet diversity goals.

Sportsmail may reveal that top officials are leading what are considered groundbreaking plans to compile a comprehensive database of qualified coaches from under-represented backgrounds in professional football for the project to go live next month .

The Coach Index will be a unique online encyclopedia of coaches from black, Asian and mixed ethnicities, provided they have at least a UEFA B license.

Premier League to launch revolutionary Coach Index to increase diversity in clubs

The self-registration catalog is open to both male and female coaches provided they meet the qualification criteria.

The new directory, which has been developed in collaboration with the main stakeholders in English football, including the Football Association, will allow professional clubs to access coaches who meet the criteria of the Index. Each coach will be characterized by their qualifications and experience – but not by name to ensure full transparency during an application process.

Registered coaches will have the ability to receive job alerts straight to their phones and development opportunities – such as upcoming networking events – while also providing access to other career platforms at EFL and the FA.

The imminent launch of the Coaches Index comes a week after the FA released a mixed set of results from the first year of its landmark Code of Leadership for Football Diversity.

Last year the governing body launched the pioneering document which aims to improve diversity and inclusion in top positions in English football.

As part of the Football Diversity Leadership Code, diversity targets were exceeded in key categories of male managerial and coaching positions - Crystal Palace manager Patrick Vieira pictured

As part of the Football Diversity Leadership Code, diversity targets were exceeded in key categories of male managerial and coaching positions – Crystal Palace manager Patrick Vieira pictured

Fifty-one clubs have signed up as founding members of the code, with all 20 Premier League teams now committed – all tasked with meeting strict diversity goals at coach and board level.

The Premier League and EFL clubs collectively failed to meet six of the eight targets set for them, although the fact that a number of clubs had to downsize due to the pandemic was a key mitigating factor.

However, in what was seen as an important victory, targets were exceeded in key categories of managerial and men’s coaching roles.

And the Premier League’s new database will help clubs meet their workforce diversity commitments.

Former England B international Paul Elliott, who became Chelsea’s first black captain, believes the Premier League’s move is a positive step towards greater inclusion in the game.

Paul Elliott, who became Chelsea's first black captain, backed Premier League program

Paul Elliott, who became Chelsea’s first black captain, backed Premier League program

“It has the potential to be very powerful as clubs can now go directly to coaches, as one of the biggest challenges has always been accessing the talent pipeline,” said Elliott, who led the development of the FA’s diversity code.

“I was from that generation of the early 90s, which was the most difficult. Because as black coaches we were the absolute minority.

“I got my first opportunity through Glenn Hoddle, he was Chelsea manager at the time and a great coach, and he gave me the opportunity to coach the youth team at Chelsea.

“But that was the only real opportunity I got because Glenn became England manager and I, like many others, tried to contact clubs and send in my applications, but the landscape was never productive because it was always about who you knew, not what you knew.

“This (the Coach Index) isn’t the total answer, but it’s a really solid foundation, alongside the Diversity Code, on the pitch. The clubs can’t say the pipeline isn’t there – there are no excuses. You can’t say “I don’t know where to go”.

“It will encourage coaches from ethnic minorities to pick up their coach badges. This should mean that there is a level playing field.

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